HomeJPAIR Multidisciplinary Research Journalvol. 45 no. 1 (2021)

Bullying and Self-Concept among Senior High School Students

RYAN G PONCE | PERRIK I. BAYARAS | HYA MARIE BLANCA | VANESSA V. GUTIERREZ | VANCE LOUIE HORBINO | JEROME VINCENT VILLARUEL | WILLIAM JO SE M. BILLOTE

Discipline: Psychology

 

Abstract:

Bullying takes many forms, serves different functions, and is manifested in different patterns of relationships. This study employed a descriptive research design that aimed to identify and describe the forms of bullying experienced by 32 senior high school students of Saint Dominic College of Batanes, Inc. and how their bullying experiences affect their self-concept. Inventory questionnaires were utilized to gather data. Using Mean Analysis, ANOVA One-Way Repeated Measures, and Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient, the following were revealed. Firstly, senior high school students often experienced Verbal, Psychological, and Social forms of bullying and seldom experienced Cyber and Physical forms of bullying. However, the more prevalent forms of bullying experienced by senior high school students were Verbal, Psychological, Social, and Cyber. Secondly, bullying and self-concept have a significant moderate negative correlation, suggesting a substantial and inverse relationship. Lastly, Physical Appearance, Conduct/Morality, and Peer Acceptance are the areas of self-concept often influenced by bullying among senior high school students. On the other hand, Scholastic Competence and Athletic Competence are the areas of self-concept seldom influenced by bullying among senior high school students. However, Physical Appearance, Conduct/Morality, and Peer Acceptance are the areas of self-concept more influenced by bullying among senior high school students.