HomePhilippine Journal of Veterinary Medicinevol. 48 no. 1 (2011)

Characterization of Guard Hair from the Different Body Regions of the Philippine Brown Deer, Cervus marianus Desmarest, 1822 (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) by Scanning Electron Microscopy

Ceferino P. Maala | Marianne Leila A. Santiago-flores | Joachim D. Sacnahon

Discipline: Veterinary Medicine

 

Abstract:

 

The surface morphology of the cuticular scales and the medulla on transverse section of guard hairs in both sexes of young and adult Philippine brown deer, Cervus marianus Desmarest, 1822 were examined using a scanning electron microscope. Imbricate flattened cuticular pattern was observed in the majority of hairs in young male and female Philippine brown deer. Only those in the head of young male and dorsum of young female exhibited imbricate crenate cuticular pattern. In contrast, with the exception in the dorsum of adult

male and female, and forelimb in adult male deer, all hairs in both sexes showed imbricate crenate cuticular pattern. Majority of the hairs in young male and adult deer showed cuticular scales with smooth dorsal margins except that in the head of young male deer. On the other hand, with the exception in the forelimb of adult male deer, the cuticular scales of all hairs had serrated dorsal margins. In both sexes of young and adult deer, the hairs exhibited a mixture of transverse and oblique orientation of the cuticular scales, although more hairs in the adult deer showed transversely oriented cuticular scales than in young deer. Hairs from various body regions in young and adult deer showed distinct medulla on transverse section. The shape of the medulla which generally followed that of the hair shaft showed flattened medullary cells that were separated from one another by air spaces. The shape of the medulla ranged from oval- to oblong-shaped with a few biconcave medullas (forelimb of young female, hindlimb and dorsum of adult male and

female deer). The study showed that the morphology of the medulla of hair on transverse section can be better examined using a scanning electron microscope.